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When we talk about 'language', sometimes we mean speech (spoken language), sometimes writing (written language). How are they different? Of course, speech is spoken and heard, while writing is written and read. But there are many other differences:
The following was passed by LSA members present at the Annual Business Meeting of the LSA in Baltimore, Maryland, on January 8, 2010 as a "sense of majority of the meeting" resolution. It was submitted to the membership at large in May 2011 for a "sense of the majority of the membership" and passed by a majority of the members responding.
The Guidelines were first developed by the Language and National Origin Group in 2004 and subsequently published in The International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law: Forensic Linguistics, Vol. 11 no. 2, pp.261-266. Whereas the Linguistic Society of America recognizes that the links between a person's language competence and their social background and national origin are potentially complex; and
From time to time, the LSA is called upon to state its position on a matter of public importance to the profession and/or field of linguistics. Read more about Resolutions, Statements, Endorsements, and related actions and how to propose them.
The following was passed by LSA members present at the Annual Business Meeting of the LSA in Baltimore, Maryland, on January 8, 2010 as a "sense of majority of the meeting" resolution. It was submitted to the membership at large in May 2011 for a "sense of the majority of the membership" and passed by a majority of the members responding.
Drafted by Geoff Nunberg 28 December 1986: Approved by members attending the 61st Annual Business Meeting, New York Hilton, New York, NY 1 July 1987: Adopted by LSA membership in a mail ballot Whereas several states have recently passed measures making English their "official state language," and

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