Background

Established in 2019.

The C.L. Baker Award Committee reviews nominations for the C.L. Baker Award.  The C.L. Baker Award, also established in 2019, recognizes excellence in research in the area of syntactic theory on the part of a scholar who is at the mid-point of a distinguished career. When nominations are presented for this award, the Committee evaluates them, and may or may not recommend a candidate for this award to the Executive Committee, which must formally approve the recommendation.

Responsibilities

As indicated above, the committee reviews preliminary nominations, which must be submitted to the Secretariat by 1 August, and then final nominations received by 1 September.

Membership (by invitation)

Three individuals with expertise in syntactic theory.

Committee Members, 2019

  • James McCloskey, University of California, Santa Cruz, Chair
  • Stephen M. Wechsler, Univesrity of Texas at Austin
  • Jane Grimshaw, Rutgers University

Executive Committee Liaison: TBD
Staff Liaison: David Robinson

 



Bio

C.L. (Lee) Baker (1939-1997) made important contributions to the study of syntactic theory and the syntax of English. At the time of his death, he was the Harold C. and Alice T. Nowlin Professor in Liberal Arts at the University of Texas at Austin, where he had been a member of the faculty for nearly thirty years and served two terms as department chair. Baker's work was notable for its careful treatment of empirical data, its lack of dogmatism, and its attention to larger issues related to language acquisition (e.g., in his 1979 article, "Syntactic theory and the projection problem"). He wrote two textbooks (Introduction to Generative-Transformational Syntax, and 1989 and 1995 editions of English Syntax), co-edited (with John McCarthy) a conference proceedings volume (The Logical Problem of Language Acquisition), and served in editorial roles for Linguistic Inquiry and Linguistic Analysis.  His untimely passing represented a significant loss for his family, friends, students, and colleagues, and for the profession of linguistics.