Nominations

Please note the following changes to LSA awards for 2020.  These changes have been occasioned by fiscal constraints the LSA is facing as a result of the coronavirus pandemic and by the fact that the 2021 Annual Meeting will be held virtually.

  • nominations for most awards will be due later than usual.  Preliminary nominations, for the awards that require them, will be due October 10, 2020. Final nominations will be due October 25, 2020.
  • winners will have an awards certificate mailed to them.  

For more information about an individual award, click on one of the links below.  Preliminary nominations for LSA Awards and Honors are invited throughout the year up until the deadline specified below. Preliminary nominations received after the deadline will be deferred for review until the next nomination cycle.  Exceptions are the Best Paper in Language Award (all articles published in Language are automatically eligible), the Excellence in Community Linguistics Award (which has its own procedure), the Leonard Bloomfield Book Award (which has its own deadline and committee), the Linguistics Journalism Award (which has its own deadline and review committee), and the Student Abstract Award (all Annual Meeting abstracts authored solely by students are automatically eligible). 

Awards Nominations are submitted in two mandatory phases:  1) a preliminary nomination, consisting of the nominee’s name, CV and/or website URL, and the award for which the nomination is being submitted; and 2) a final nomination.  The purpose of a preliminary nomination is to alert the Awards Committee of your intent, and to offer early assistance in helping you prepare a successful nomination. Following receipt of a preliminary nomination, you will be contacted directly with additional details about the kinds of assistance available.  Preliminary nominations must be submitted no later than August 1 to allow sufficient time for assistance to be offered in preparing a final nomination. 

Click on one of the links below for descriptions of the individual awards, and to submit a nomination, and note that, with few exceptions, nominees must be current members of the LSA.  The Awards Committee will assist all nominators, if desired, in preparing a final nomination (see individual awards for requirements), which will be due by September 1, and will offer assistance in identifying potential co-nominators (although this is not a requirement).  In some cases, sample letters of successful prior nominations are available upon request from the LSA staff. Nominations of women and underrepresented ethnic minorities are particularly encouraged.

Once a final nomination has been submitted, it will be retained and reconsidered for a period of five years (three years in the case of the Excellence in Community Lingusitics Award).  In the in the case of the Early Career Award, the nomination will not be carried over beyond the the ten-year post-Ph.D. time limit.  Nominators will be given the opportunity to update their nomination materials annually. 

Note: Nominations for sitting members of the LSA Executive Committee (EC) will not be considered.  If a member of the Executive Committee was unsuccessfully nominated for an award prior to beginning their service, their nomination will not be considered while they are serving on the EC. 

All awards, with the exception of the Student Abstract awards, are subject to approval by the LSA Executive Committee.



[Pictured above right: Shelly (Rochelle) Lieber, Ingo Plag & Laurie Bauer, The Oxford Reference Guide to English Morphology, which received the Leonard Bloomfield Book Award in 2015. Photo Credit: Katharine Kimball]

Best Paper in Language Award

C.L. Baker Award

Early Career Award

Elizabeth Dayton Award

Excellence in Community Linguistics Award 

Kenneth L. Hale Award

Leonard Bloomfield Book Award

Linguistics Journalism Award

Linguistic Service Award

Linguistics, Language, and the Public Award

Mentoring Award

Student Abstract Award

Victoria A. Fromkin Lifetime Service Award


Best Paper in Language Award

This award, made for the first time in 2012, is given for the best paper published in the journal in any given year. All papers published in a given year are eligible for review and then ranked by the Awards Committee. Associate Editors of Language are invited to recommend specific articles in their areas of expertise for priority review by the Awards Committee. As per LSA policy, each paper must have at least one LSA member as an author.

Current Holders:


*picture clockwise from upper right

Natasha Abner, Molly Flaherty, Katelyn Stangl, Marie Coppola, Diane Brentari, and Susan Goldin-Meadow

"The noun-verb distinction in established and emergent sign systems" (Language  Volume 95, Number 2 (June))

In a number of signed languages, the distingtion between nouns and verbs is evident in the morphophonology of the signs themselves. This research uses a novel elicitation paradigm to investigate the systematicity emergence and development of the noun-verb distinction in an established sign language, American Sign Language (ASL), an emerging sign language, Nicaraguan Sign Language (NSL), and in the precursor to NSL, Nicaraguan homesigns. Results suggest that intergenerational transmission to new learners plays a key role in the development of devices such as moevement repetition and base hand, and bear not only on the importance of the noun-verb distinction in human communication, but also on how this distinction emerges and continues to develop in a new (sign) language, and also on the origins of certain patterns of similaries and differences across languages most broadly construed.



Previous Holders:

For a list of previous holders of the Best Paper in Language Award, click here.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          


C.L. Baker Award

This award, given for the first time in 2020, is intended to honor the legacy of the late C. L. Baker (1939-1997) and is funded by a generous gift from his family.  The winner receives a $500 honorarium and will be recognized at the Awards Ceremony at the LSA Annual Meeting. 

Frequency:  Annually, as nominations warrant.

Next Nomination Deadline: A preliminary nomination consisting of the nominee's name, CV and/or website URL, must be submitted here no later than August 1, 2021.  A final nomination, consisting of a nomination form, an updated curriculum vitae for the nominee, and a brief citation that can be read at the presentation of the award, must be submitted at the same link by September 1, 2021.  In the typical case, nominations will be submitted by a colleague or group of colleagues of the nominee, but self-nominations are not excluded.

Eligibility: The C.L. Baker Award recognizes excellence in research in the area of syntactic theory on the part of a scholar who is at the mid-point of a distinguished career.  The typical nominee will be at least 3 years beyond tenure and will  be on the brink of being promoted to the next major rank past the tenure point -- full Professor at many universities, perhaps different in the case of institutions which use the title Professor at the point of tenure.  Scholars very recently promoted to that rank are not excluded.  The typical nominee will thus be 10-20 years beyond the dissertation. Nominees should be members of the LSA at the time the prize is awarded.

The prize is intended to recognize a distinguished and still unfolding research record in syntax, one which meets the following criteria:

  •  it has had significant impact,
  •  it is forward-looking and innovative,
  •  it is empirically careful, and
  •  it engages the larger intellectual context for research on human language and goes beyond the merely technical in its analyses and proposals.

Current Holder:

Jon Sprouse (University of Connecticut) 

Jon Sprouse is an experimental syntatician whose work is characterized by imagination, innovation, care, and respect for the facts. he has made methodological contributions of central importance, enabling syntaticians to base their theoretical work on a much more secure empirical foundation. He has also made contributions of central importance to some of the core issues in syntax and linguistics more broadly- concerning the nature of island-hood and (in collaboration with Lisa Pearl) the theroy of learnability. 


Early Career Award

Instituted in 2010, this award recognizes scholars early in their career who have made outstanding contributions to the field of linguistics. The award provides travel reimbursement (up to $500) and complimentary registration for the next Annual Meeting. Nominators must be current LSA members.

Frequency: Annually, as nominations warrant.

Next Nomination Deadline: A preliminary nomination consisting of the nominee's name, CV and/or website URL, must be submitted here no later than October 10, 2020.  A final nomination, consisting a nomination form, an updated curriculum vitae for the nominee, and a brief citation that can be read at the presentation of the award, must be submitted at the same link by October 25, 2020.

Eligibility: Any LSA member who received the Ph.D. degree no more than ten years before being nominated.  (When the Early Career Award was instituted, the time limit was seven years.  It was raised to ten years in 2015, to take effect with the 2016 award.)

The letter of nomination should include the following, as appropriate:

  • evidence of satisfying eligibility criteria
  • discussion of scholarly products and evaluation of their importance/significance. Mention breadth of (sub)field(s) that are impacted and depth of impact in specific subfields
  • discussion of publication quality and rate, in comparison to other linguists at that career stage
  • evidence of original thinking: of having gone beyond dissertation work into different/cutting edge areas, and/or of having explored new approaches to old problems
  • discussion of contributions to public awareness and exposure to linguistics
  • discussion of contributions to the field (conference planning, service to local and national organizations, etc.)
  • discussion of contributions to language community or communities
  • discussion of contributions to workplace, university/departmental life, if appropriate

Current Holder:

2020 Gabriela Pérez Báez (University of Oregon)

This award is bestowed for contributions to the documentation of Zapotecan languages, for raising public awareness of language diversity and endangerment, and for leading efforts to train members of speaker communities in North America and Mexico. The breadth of Dr. Gabriela Pérez Báez's contributions is remarkable, and, as Curator of Linguistics at the Smithsonian Institution, she served for over eight years as a public face of the field within on of the world's most important cultural institutions. Her leadership has allowed events such as the National Breath of Life Archival Institues for Indigenous Langues to thrive, and her forthcoming Isthmus Zapotec dictionary will become a landmark publication. 

Previous Holders:

For a list of previous holders of the Early Career Award, click here.

 


Elizabeth Dayton Award

First established in 2019, the Elizabeth Dayton Award is a travel award for graduate students pursuing a specialization in sociolinguistics to attend the LSA Annual Meeting. The award will cover registration, travel, lodging, and per diem costs subject to the earnings of the initial endowment over the prior 12-month period. 

Frequency: Annually, as applications warrant.

Next Nomination Deadline: A final nomination must be submitted here by October 25, 2020.

Eligibility: Applicants must attest that they meet the basic criteria for the award – are LSA members, are graduate students, and are pursuing a course of studies with a specialization in sociolinguistics – and will submit a CV, a transcript, and a statement of 250 words or less detailing how winning the Dayton Award will enhance their scholarly career as evidence of a distinguished level of scholastic achievement.

Current Holder:

2020 Valentyna Filimonova (Indiana University Bloomington)


Excellence in Community Linguistics Award

First established in 2013, this award recognizes the outstanding contributions that members of language communities (typically outside the academic sphere of professional linguists) make for the benefit of their community’s language. The contributions made by awardees may be varied, including, among other things, documentation work with a linguist as a consultant and efforts towards language revitalization.

Frequency: Annually, as nominations warrant.

Next Nomination Deadline: A final nomination must be submitted here by October 25, 2020.

Eligibility: Please refer to the official Call for Nominations for details regarding eligibility.

Current Holder: 

2020 Mosyel Syelsaangthyel Khaling

Mosyel Syelsaangthyel Khaling (in red turban) receives this year's Excellence in Community Linguistics Award for his long-term work to ensure the maintenance of his language Uipo-an endangered Southern Tangkhulic language-and his commitment to deep community engagement, what his nominator refers to as his "non-standard, highly valuable documentation methods." Facing the disappearance of Uipo oral traditions, he invented original methods for their documentation resorting to the collective memory of tribal elders. The duration- Mr. Khaling started work on his language in 1976 at age 17- and extent of his contributions are outstanding and he did this work without any external support for a number of years. Mr. Khaling''s longstanding and continued efforts to document and increase literacy in Uipo are both admirable and commendable. 

Previous Holders:

For a list of previous holders of the Excellence in Community Linguistics Award, click here.


Kenneth L. Hale Award

First presented in 2002, this award recognizes scholars who have done outstanding work on the documentation of a particular language or family of languages that is endangered or no longer spoken. Nominations must be accompanied by relevant supporting materials, such as copies of representative work. Nominators must be current LSA members.

Frequency: As nominations warrant

Next Nomination Deadline: A preliminary nomination consisting of the nominee's name, CV and/or website URL must be submitted here no later than October 10, 2020.  A final nomination, consisting of a copy of relevant work product (books, articles, scholarly materials, recordings, etc.) and any other supporting material, and a brief citation that can be read at the presentation of the award, must be submitted here by October 25, 2020..

Eligibility: All authors must be current members of the LSA and relevant works should normally be no more than 15-20 years old.

The letter of nomination should include detailed description of the nominee’s contributions, as appropriate:

  • description of documentation products (books, dictionaries, grammars, articles, etc.)
  • evaluation of quality of the scholar's work
  • discussion of status of language being documented, evidence of endangerment/extinction; evaluation of relative need for documentation
  • discussion of commitment to the language and its speakers
  • importance of work to public, the language community, and scholars

Current Holder:

2020 Patience Epps (University of Texas at Austin)

This award is given in recognition of Professor Patience Epp's contributions to Hup, Dâw, and the other fragile and little-studied Nadahup languages of Brazil's Upper Rio Negro basin. Her work in Nadahup communities, ongoing since 2001, has yielded educational and literary materials in community languages, a major grammar, extensive digital archives, and numerous articles. She exemplifies the spirit of Ken Hale's work by using language documentation to address broad social, culutral, historical, typological, and theoretical issues that transcend the boundaries of her own fieldwork and by ensuring that her research is always guided by an ongoing commitment to, and collaboration with, her host.

Previous Holders:

For a list of previous holders of the Kenneth Hale award, click here.


Leonard Bloomfield Book Award

First presented in 1992, this award recognizes a volume that makes an outstanding contribution of enduring value to our understanding of language and linguistics. Nominations must address the volume's exemplary scholarship, enduring value, novelty, empirical import, conceptual significance, and clarity, and include a brief citation that can be read at the presentation of the award.

This award is chosen by the LSA's Bloomfield Book Award Committee, which evaluates all books submitted and recommends one title to the Executive Committee, which must formally approve the recommendation.

Frequency: Annually

Next Nomination Deadline: 1 May 2021

Nominations must be accompanied by five copies of the book prior to the deadline. Publishers as well as LSA members may nominate a book for the Bloomfield Award. Nominations may be submitted here.

Eligibility: All authors of nominated books should be current members of the LSA. Exceptions may be made at the discretion of the selection committee for books whose authors are not all LSA members, such as books with co-authors who are native speaker language consultants who collaborated in the preparation of the book, but who are not otherwise part of the Linguistics community. In all cases, at least one author must be a member of the LSA. Book must be published after 29 February 2020 and before 31 May 2021.

Criteria: 

  • Novelty (says something that is not part of the published literature)
  • Empirical Import (claims made are empirically falsifiable)
  • Conceptual Significance (enriches overall understanding of the nature of human language)
  • Clarity (points are clearly formulated; text is reader-friendly)

Current Holder:

2020 Vsevolod Kapatsinski for Changing Minds Changing Tools: From Learning Theory to Language Acquistion to Language Change (MIT Press, 2018)

Vsevolod Kapatsinski’s Changing Minds Changing Tools offers an extraordinary synthesis of contemporary learning theory in a usage-based approach to language. It argues that associationist learning, error-driven predictive learning, and Bayesian learning all play a role in different aspects of language use, acquisition, and change. This integrated model of learning is able to account for an enormous range of experimental results without invoking language-specific learning mechanisms. Focusing on phonetics, phonology, morphology and the lexicon, the book shows how general learning mechanisms can account for distributional learning, learning schematic linguistic structure, and learning paradigmatic structure. Kapatsinski demonstrates how neurocognitive learning theory can ground theories of language structure, language processing, language acquisition, and language change in the fundamental phenomenon of language use.

Previous Holders:

For a list of previous holders of the Leonard Bloomfield Book Award, click here.


Linguistic Service Award

First presented in 2007, this award honors members of the LSA who have performed distinguished service to the Society. This service might take various forms, for example: Extended time devoted to tasks in the service of the Society; extraordinary uncompensated service to the Society; or brief service resulting in substantial cost savings for the Society. Development of materials for publicizing the field or the activities of the Society. Nominees and nominators must be current LSA members.

Frequency: As nominations warrant

Next Nomination Deadline: A preliminary nomination consisting of the nominee's name, CV and/or website URL must be submitted here no later than October 10, 2020.  A final nomination, consisting of a nomination form outlining why the individual should be recognized, and a brief citation that can be read at the presentation of the award, must be submitted here by October 25, 2020..

Eligibility: All nominees must be current LSA members.

The letter of nomination should include the following, as appropriate:

  • discussion of career history, particularly as relevant to linguistic service
  • discussion of service to the LSA: (e.g. committee participation, promotion efforts, office service). Specific details of contributions and time commitments are helpful.
  • discussion of contributions to language and linguistics beyond the LSA

Current Holder:

2020 Pop-Up Mentoring Program (PUMP)

The organizers of PUMP, working in collaboration with COSWL and conference sponsors in linguistics, have provided an invaluable service to linguists seeking short-term mentoring relationships. In just two years, PUMP has served 379 linguists at 15 conferences and Institutes. The volunteer organizers have donated many hours of time and effort to outreach and coordination, including matching mentors with mentees. Their contributions have provided invaluable support for those participating, and greatly helped to advance the LSA’s Mentoring Initiative. The PUMP team is pictured at right, clockwise from  top left: Melissa Baese-Berk, Paola Cepeda, Hadas Kotek, Kristen Syrett, Jessica Rett, Ivona Kucerova.

Previous Holders:

For a list of previous holders of the Linguistic Service Award, click here.


Linguistics Journalism Award

Established by the LSA in 2014, this award honors the journalist whose work best represents linguistics during the 12-month consideration period indicated in the call for nominations.

The award is based on a single news story or body of work that reflects accuracy and timeliness as regards the material but is also appealing to nonspecialist audiences.  The current call for nominations will be for the period covering June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2020. 

Selection of the award recipient will be made by a committee consisting of 2-3 members of the LSA Public Relations Committee (PRC), the Director of Communications, and the Executive Committee liaison to the PRC. 

Frequency: As nominations warrant

Next Nomination Deadline: There is no preliminary nomination deadline for this award.  A final nomination, consisting of a letter of support of a letter of no more than three pages, copies of the work or links to the work for which the person is being nominated, a brief citation that can be read at the presentation of the award, and any other supporting material, must be submitted here by October 25, 2020.. 

Eligibility: Nominations may be submitted by any individual or entity that wishes to do so, including members of the award selection committee. The news story must have been presented/published during the time period specified in the call for nominations. Nominations are particularly encouraged from LSA members, news organizations, journalists, and public relations professionals.

The letter of nomination should include the following, as appropriate:

  • Significance of the story or body of work which is the basis of the nomination
  • Accessibility of the work to non-specialist audiences

Current Holder:

2020 Thomas Curwen (Los Angeles Times)

In his May 2019 Column One feature for the Los Angeles Times, Thomas Curwen brings readers into the world of Tongva language reclamation, emphasizing the voices of indigenous people involved in the project. Through interviews with UCLA linguist Pam Munro, Curwen is able to provide a taste of the linguistic technicalities involved. Rich, multimedia supplementary materials allow readers to learn more about Tongva language, geography, and history, and a teachers’ guide makes this feature an outstanding resource for K-12 education. The LSA applauds Curwen for journalism that showcases linguistics and the importance of language in culture and identity

Previous Holder:

For a list of previous holders of the Linguistics Journalism Award, click here.


Linguistics, Language, and the Public Award

First presented in 1997, this award honors an individual or group for work that effectively increases public awareness and understanding of linguistics and language. Works in any medium are eligible, including books, documentary films, software, and lectures. For works of journalism, particularly news stories, blog posts, and magazine articles, a nomination for the LSA Linguistics Journalism Award may be more appropriate. Nominees need not be LSA members. Nominators must be current LSA members. In order to be considered, individuals must have published, presented, or aired some representative work during the four years immediately preceding the deadline for the receipt of entries. Note that, because an individual's representative work is eligible for four years, work could be considered in more than one award cycle. Nominations must present evidence of the work's impact (e.g. letters of commendation, news coverage, public notices). The awardee is invited to attend and, if appropriate, to present the work at the Annual Meeting.

Frequency: As nominations warrant

Next Nomination Deadline: A preliminary nomination, consisting of the nominee's name, CV and/or website URL, must be submitted here by October 10, 2020.  Final nominations, consisting of a nomination form and a brief citation that can be read at the presentation of the award, must be submitted here by October 25, 2020. Any hard copies of supporting materials (unavailable in electronic format) should be sent to the LSA via postal mail; please provide four copies of supporting materials where applicable. 

Eligibility: works in any medium are eligible, e.g. books, documentary films, articles in popular magazines, software, or lecture series but must have been published, presented, or aired during the four years immediately prior to the nomination.

The letter of nomination should include the following, as appropriate:

  • describe the work that increases public awareness of language and linguistics;
  • evidence that the work has had a demonstrable impact on public awareness of language and/or linguistics.

Current Holder:

2020 Jessica Coon (McGill University) 

This award is bestowed for Jessica Coon’s work with the crew, actors and director of Arrival—featuring a linguist whose task is to communicate with an alien species that has arrived on earth—and for tirelessly promoting the field of Linguistics through dozens of related print and on-camera interviews and invited lectures. Prof. Coon helped make the portrayal of a linguist realistic, and importantly, she seized this opportunity to talk to the public about the scientific study of language and the importance of linguistic diversity. Through her many interviews and appearances she has helped bring Linguistics to a new audience in an authentic and accessible way

Previous Holders:

For a list of previous holders of the Linguistics, Language, and Public Award, click here.


 

Mentoring Award

Instituted in 2019, this award recognizes the work of individuals who, or organizations that, have exhibited a sustained commitment to mentoring linguists.  Specific types of mentoring to be considered include assisting mentees to present and publish their work, and to find financial aid;  providing career guidance;  providing support, encouragement, and essential strategies for life in the linguistics community; and demonstrating continued interest in the mentee’s professional advancement.  Particular emphasis will be placed, when considering nominations, on mentoring a diverse pool of mentees; sustained mentoring efforts over many years; and mentoring of early career linguists.

Frequency: Annually, as nominations warrant.

Next Nomination Deadline: A preliminary nomination consisting of the nominee's name, CV (for individuals), and/or website URL, must be submitted here  no later than October 10, 2020.  A final nomination, consisting of a nomination form and and a brief citation that can be read at the presentation of the award, must be submitted at the same link by October 25, 2020.

Eligibility: Any individual or organization meeting the nomination criteria.  Nominators must be LSA members. 

The final nomination should include the following, as appropriate:

  • description of mentorship activities and research; mentor programs and activities; target audiences; and outcomes where appropriate
  • where appropriate, indication of how the nominee’s work resulted in departmental and/or institutional change in terms of the granting of degrees to underrepresented students
  • list of individuals mentored
  • letter(s) of support from colleagues (for individuals) or stakeholders (or organizations)

Current Holder:

2020 Monica Macaulay (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Throughout her career, Monica Macaulay has embodied the word “mentor.” She has been instrumental in the creation of various resources focused on providing guidance and mentoring for linguists, including the Women in Linguistics Mentoring Alliance (WILMA), the “Surviving Linguistics” guidebook, and professional development sessions at the LSA’s Annual Meetings and Linguistic Institutes.  She has also personally mentored scores of linguists and their allies over the many years she has been active professionally. Dr. Macaulay is the ideal linguist to receive the LSA's very first Mentoring Award.

Student Abstract Award

Instituted in 2010, this award provides $500 for the best abstract submitted by a student for a paper or poster presentation at the next Annual Meeting, and $300 for the submitters of the abstracts rated second and third. Every student who submits an abstract for the Annual Meeting is automatically considered for this award; no nominations are required. All abstracts submitted for the annual meeting are rated, blindly, by external reviewers and the LSA Program Committee. Once abstracts have been accepted, the LSA Staff (who have access to information about abstract submitters) will determine which student abstracts were most highly rated. In case of a tie, the Awards Committee members will read the abstracts and select the winner and the two runners-up. The awardees will be publicly announced as soon as they have been selected, and will be recognized in the Handbook for the Annual Meeting.

Frequency: Annually

Eligibility: every student who submits an abstract for the Annual Meeting is automatically considered for this award; no nominations are required.

Current Holders:

  • First Place: Kate Mooney (New York University): Unifying Prosodic and Segmental Repair: Metathesis and Epenthesis in Uab Meto
  • Second Place: Milena Šereikaitė (University of Pennsylvania): Case of Complex Event Nominalizations in Lithuanian
  • Third Place: Anna Bax (University of California, Santa Barbara): Linguist-speech pathologists collaboration as service-in-return to speakers of minority languages

Previous Holders:

For a list of previous holders of the Student Abstract Award, click here.


Victoria A. Fromkin Lifetime Service Award

First presented in 2001 as the "Victoria A. Fromkin Prize for Distinguished Service", this award recognizes individuals who have performed extraordinary service to the discipline and to the Society throughout their career. Nominees and nominators must be current LSA members.

Frequency: As nominations warrant

Next Nomination Deadline: A preliminary nomination, consisting of the nominee's name, CV and/or website URL, must be submitted here no later than October 10, 2020.  A final nomination, consisting of a nominatino form outlining why the individual should be recognized, and a brief citation that can be read at the presentation of the award, must be suibmitted here by October 25, 2020.

Eligibility: all nominees must be current members of the LSA.

The letter of nomination should include the following, as appropriate:

  • discussion of service to the LSA
  • discussion of unusual contributions to LSA’s success
  • evidence of extraordinary commitment to LSA, its staff, and its members
  • evidence of sustained contributions

Current Holder:

2018 Sarah Thomason (University of Michigan)

Over her career Sally Thomason has contributed more to the field of linguistics in both research and service than what most scholars will achieve in a lifetime in only one of these areas. Her research has propelled the field forward; her mentoring activities have placed many junior scholars on trajectories toward success; and her service to the Society has benefited all linguists in significant ways. Sally’s contributions to the field of linguistics and the LSA in particular is richly deserving of recognition through the  Victoria A. Fromkin Lifetime Service Award.

Previous Holders:

For a list of previous holders of the Victoria A. Fromkin Lifetime Service Award, click here.

External Honors and Awards:

For information about external honors and awards for linguists, such as NASEM, please visit this page.